Nigeria gets new permanent secretaries, trims ministries

Nigeria President Muhammadu Buhari has appointed 18 new permanent secretaries to fill vacancies created with the compulsory retirements carried in the federal civil service on Tuesday.
The president has also trimmed the number of federal ministries.
The new appointments bring to 38 the number of federal permanent secretaries now in the civil service.
They were all assigned to ministries and cabinet offices and directed to commence work immediately.
The position of permanent secretary is the highest in the civil service hierarchy and wields enormous power.
The posting of the super civil servants confirmed speculation that the government would trim the number of ministries as a cost saving measure.
class=”MsoNoSpacing”Twenty-five permanent secretaries were posted to the ministries and the rest to cabinet offices.
class=”MsoNoSpacing”Portfolios
The ministries of police affairs, aviation and special duties have been scrapped while those of works, housing and urban development have been merged.
Also, the ministries of information, culture, national orientation and tourism have been collapsed into one ministry of information and culture, as have the ministries of sports and youth development into a single ministry of sports and youth development.
The ministry of aviation is now under the ministry of transportation.
The president’s special aisor on media, Mr Femi Adesina, announced the deployment of the permanent secretaries in a statement released late on Tuesday.
According to the postings, Dr Shehu Ahmad will be in charge of agriculture and rural development, Mr Sunday Echono of communications, while Alhaji Sabiu Zakari takes charge of transportation.
Others are Mrs Ayotunde Adesugba in information and culture, Mr Danjuma Sheni in defence, Dr Shade Yemi-Esan in education, Mrs Fatima Mede in budget and national planning, and Alhaji Mahmoud Isa Dutse in finance.
Meanwhile, the 36 ministers-designate will be inaugurated and assigned portfolios on Wednesday.

SOURCE: AFRICA REVIEW