Court orders production of Nigeria secessionists’ leader

A magistrate in Abuja has ordered the production of the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra, Mr Nnamdi Kanu, in court on November 23.
The court directed the Department of the State Security Service (DSS) to produce the Director of pirate Radio Biafra, who is standing trial for treason and felony
The Chief Magistrate, Mr Shauibu Usman, gave the order following the absence of the accused in court when the trial was to commence.
Usman insisted that no trial can continue in a criminal case in the absence of the accused.
Mr Kanu’s supporters have been organising protests for his release.
Underground radio
Protesters took to the streets in Aba, the south eastern Abia State capital, to demand the release of Mr Kanu, who operated an underground radio station calling for a separate state of Biafra.
The accused was not presented in court to answer to the preliminary charges on Wednesday in defiance of an order issued on October 23.
In Aba, thousands of people hit the streets on Thursday in a continuation of the their protests calling for the unconditional release of Mr Kanu and for the creation of Biafra country.
The protesters disrupted the early morning traffic after they blocked major roads, but were peaceful
They carried placards which read: “Biafra or death” and waved the Biafran flag — a golden rising sun on red, black and green.
Warned the Igbo
Others wore T-shirts and caps with the image of Mr Kanu.
“Getting our leader out of detention is our immediate concern, but ultimately we want to be free from Nigeria,” the protests coordinator, Mr Ikechukwu Ugwuoha, said.
Six south-south states have distanced themselves from the call for the secession of Biafra because they do not belong to the Igbo ethnic group.
The south-south states which share boundaries with the Igbo South East states are Delta, Edo, Rivers, Bayelsa, Cross Rivers and Akwa Ibom.
Leaders of the states have banned any form of protests and warned the Igbo to stop infiltrating the states to protest.

SOURCE: AFRICA REVIEW